Learning Communities | Publications

Learning Communities & Educational Reform Monograph Series

Learning Communities and Student Affairs:
Partnering for Powerful Learning

Our newest publication explores learning communities and their potential through the lens of student affairs. Common points of involvement are examined and successful collaborative efforts at a variety of institutions are described. Examples include stories of programs that have responded effectively to some of higher education's most challenging populations: first generation students, non-traditional students and distance-learning students.

Cost: $25   Go to bookstore

Diversity, Educational Equity, and Learning Communities
This publication describes the powerful possibilities of intentionally integrating the rich history of diversity work on campuses with learning communities. The lead essay along with five campus stories illustrate the complexities and the benefits of turning classrooms and campuses into places where under-represented students experience academic success.

Cost: $18   Go to bookstore

PEW Grant Learning Communities Monographs

The Pedagogy of Possibilities: Developmental Education, College-Level Studies, and Learning Communities
invites developmental educators and learning community practitioners to create challenging and supportive learning environments for academically underprepared students. Research-based best practices in developmental education provide a rationale for adopting an approach to learning communities for developmental students that intentionally targets high-risk curriculum. Nine case studies and numerous examples illustrate this approach. Websites and additional resources for developmental education and learning communities are also included. Foreward and introduction

Cost: $15   Go to bookstore


Learning Community Research and Assessment: What We Know Now
addresses the question "do learning communities really work?" by reviewing previous assessment studies, highlighting some single institution studies and some notable research studies. It suggests areas for further research and assessment. Appendices include annotated bibliographies, a matrix of research studies, and some commercially available assessment instruments. Executive summary

Cost: $15   Go to bookstore


Doing Learning Community Assessment: Five Campus Stories
focuses on five colleges and universities (Temple, Iowa State, South Florida, Skagit Community College, Portland State) and their assessment programs, which offer examples of varying goals, methods, and outcomes.

Cost: $12   Go to bookstore


Integrating Learning Communities with Service-Learning
introduces the common features of service-learning and learning communities and how each movement can enhance the other. Eight case studies follow, focusing on different kinds of service-learning integration in various kinds of institutions, plus a chapter on getting started. Additional resources include publications and web sites on service-learning, learning communities, community-based research, and reflective practice.

Cost: $12   Go to bookstore


Learning Communities in Community Colleges
includes an extended analysis of how learning communities meet the multiple purposes and pressures of community colleges, and brief profiles of eighteen programs that fit various college goals (e.g., general education, basic skills, and community partnerships). Tips on getting started, a selective list of print resources, and names and email addresses offer additional information specifically for learning communities in community colleges.

Cost: $10   Go to bookstore


Learning Communities and Fiscal Reality: Optimizing Learning in a Time of Restricted Resources
reviews the critical issues facing learning communities in a time of limited resources. Different approaches to designing learning communities are discussed in terms of their educational and fiscal implications. Considerations in designing sustainable learning community programs are described.

Cost: $10   Go to bookstore


Learning Communities and the Academic Library
provides a history and analysis of the learning community movement in higher education and examples of academic librarians' involvement in learning communities ranging from structured, credit courses to more informal arrangements within courses. It considers the place of information literacy and interdisciplinary general education by briefly describing and categorizing fourteen learning community programs. Additional information includes the Association of College and Research Libraries' Information Literacy Competency Standards and a selective list of references.

Cost: $12   Go to bookstore


Learning Communities in Liberal Arts Colleges
begins with a history of learning communities' roots in liberal arts education. Four case studies examine different goals for learning communities (e.g., recruitment and retention, curriculum development), and snapshots of four other distinctive programs show the range of models for liberal arts colleges. A list of websites and publications and names of contacts are additional resources.

Cost: $10   Go to bookstore


Learning Communities in Research Universities
includes an extended introduction surveying the history, appeal, and current issues of learning communities in research universities. Five case studies of different learning community models and brief descriptions of programs at sixteen other universities provide practical, specific examples of implementation. Websites, a publications list, and names of contacts are additional resources for information about learning communities in research universities.

Cost: $10   Go to bookstore


Learning Communities & Educational Reform Monograph Series

Learning Communities and Student Affairs:
Partnering for Powerful Learning

Our newest publication explores learning communities and their potential through the lens of student affairs. Common points of involvement are examined and successful collaborative efforts at a variety of institutions are described. Examples include stories of programs that have responded effectively to some of higher education's most challenging populations: first generation students, non-traditional students and distance-learning students.